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Archive for the ‘Eclipse’ Category


Java Eclipse Tutorial – Part 12: Setting Preferences

In this video you will learn how to set some of the most common Eclipse preferences.

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# Video Length
1 Installing the Eclipse IDE 03:18
2 Create a Java Application with Eclipse 03:44
3 Exploring the Eclipse User Interface 04:50
4.1 Searching and Navigating Source Code (part 1) 04:18
4.2 Searching and Navigating Source Code (part 2) 06:06
5 Generating Java Source Code 05:12
6.1 Refactoring Code - Extract Constants and Variables 04:13
6.2 Refactoring Code - Extract Methods, Rename Methods and Variables 04:19
7 Debugging Java Source Code 04:34
8 Adding JAR Files 05:17
9 Running JUnit Tests 05:08
10 Importing Projects 01:45
11 Exporting Projects 01:34
12 Setting Eclipse Preferences 04:09
Total 58:27

 

Video Transcript

Time – 00:00
Hi, this is Chad (shod) with luv2code.com. Welcome back to another tutorial on Eclipse. In this video, you’ll learn how to set some of the most common Eclipse preferences.

Time – 00:10
Preferences allow you to customize your Eclipse environment. I’ll show you, how to set the following preferences. We’ll look at setting the Java version, font sizes, line numbers and the default username. Okay, so let’s get started.

Time – 00:28
You can access the preferences window by selecting window preferences. You can configure Eclipse to use certain version of Java. For example, if you have multiple versions of Java installed, you can configure Eclipse to use a desired version.

Time – 00:43
To set the current version of Java that Eclipse will use, in the preferences window, you’ll select Java, installed JREs. This will show which JREs are installed and you can choose a different version, if desired. You can also set the compliance level by choosing Java compiler. This will tell Eclipse to make sure the code is compliant with the selected version of Java.

Time – 01:09
Another preference that I always set is display line numbers. By default Eclipse will not show you the line numbers. Take a look at the current screenshot. However, I find it very useful for the editor to display the line numbers for the source code.

Time – 01:24
You can set this in the preferences, it’s under general, editors, text editors and has a checkbox here for line numbers. You toggle that it will display the line numbers in the user interface. I also like to increase the font size. Sometimes I find it hard to view the small font, of course this is the personal preference, you may prefer small fonts.

Time – 01:58
You can set the font size by going to general, appearances, colors and fonts. Expand the section for Java, move down to the Java editor font, click the edit button, choose your desired font.
Here I’ll just increase the size to 24, close that click okay and note we have a much larger font in the editor.

Time – 02:26
I also like to change the default username for code templates. This is the username that Eclipse uses, when it inserts Java documentation. You can edit this preference by selecting Java, code style, code templates and then you select comments and expand the types, click edit. Here, what I’ll do is, I will append the website to the dollar sign user. This will show up in the actual Java documentation for new classes. luv2code.com, click okay and then click okay.

Time – 03:10
Now, when we add a new Java class, we will see this new information. New class, I’ll just enter a simple name of foobar, hit finish. Now, what I’ll do is, I will go through and add a comment at the beginning of this file. Here we go, we see this luv2code and our website luv2code.com.

Time – 03:38
If you can’t figure out how to set up preference, Eclipse has nice search feature. In the preferences window, you can enter a search string in the box. For example, if I want to find out, how to show the line numbers in the search box, I’ll type “line numbers” and it will take me directly to the location where I can set this option. This is very useful for finding a given preference to set.

Time – 04:02
Okay, so this wraps up our video on setting preferences in Eclipse. Please subscribe to our channel to view more videos on Eclipse and Java. Click the thumbs up to like our video. Also visit our website luv2code.com to download Java source code.

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Java Eclipse Tutorial – Part 11: Exporting Projects

In this video tutorial, I will show you how to export Eclipse projects.

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# Video Length
1 Installing the Eclipse IDE 03:18
2 Create a Java Application with Eclipse 03:44
3 Exploring the Eclipse User Interface 04:50
4.1 Searching and Navigating Source Code (part 1) 04:18
4.2 Searching and Navigating Source Code (part 2) 06:06
5 Generating Java Source Code 05:12
6.1 Refactoring Code - Extract Constants and Variables 04:13
6.2 Refactoring Code - Extract Methods, Rename Methods and Variables 04:19
7 Debugging Java Source Code 04:34
8 Adding JAR Files 05:17
9 Running JUnit Tests 05:08
10 Importing Projects 01:45
11 Exporting Projects 01:34
12 Setting Eclipse Preferences 04:09
Total 58:27

 

Video Transcript

Time – 00:00
Hi this is Chad (shod) with luv2code.com. Welcome back to another tutorial on Eclipse. In this video you will learn how to export Eclipse projects.

Time – 00:10
When you want to share your project with other developers, you can simply export the project. Eclipse will create a zip file of your project and this will include your source code and project settings. Another developer will be able to use your project by simply importing the project. If you’d like to learn how to import a project, check out my other video on importing projects.

Time – 00:30
To export your project, right click the project and select export. Then go to general, choose archive file, click next. Choose browse and give it a file name. In this example we’ll give demo-test.zip. Hit save and go ahead and click the option to Use Zip. Once that’s finished, go ahead and select finish.

Time – 01:08
At this point, Eclipse created a zip file for you on your file system. Let’s go to our file system and verify that the file is there. Here you can see demotest.zip. This project was exported successfully.

Time – 01:24
All righty. This wraps up our video on exporting projects in Eclipse. Please subscribe to our channel to view more videos on Eclipse. Also click the thumbs up to like our video. Finally, visit our website luv2code.com to download Java source code.

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Java Eclipse Tutorial – Part 10: Importing Projects

In this video you will learn how to import projects in Eclipse.

Please subscribe to this channel 🙂

Download Source Code

 

# Video Length
1 Installing the Eclipse IDE 03:18
2 Create a Java Application with Eclipse 03:44
3 Exploring the Eclipse User Interface 04:50
4.1 Searching and Navigating Source Code (part 1) 04:18
4.2 Searching and Navigating Source Code (part 2) 06:06
5 Generating Java Source Code 05:12
6.1 Refactoring Code - Extract Constants and Variables 04:13
6.2 Refactoring Code - Extract Methods, Rename Methods and Variables 04:19
7 Debugging Java Source Code 04:34
8 Adding JAR Files 05:17
9 Running JUnit Tests 05:08
10 Importing Projects 01:45
11 Exporting Projects 01:34
12 Setting Eclipse Preferences 04:09
Total 58:27

 

Video Transcript

Time – 00:00
Hi, this is Chad (shod) with luv2code.com. Welcome back to another tutorial on Eclipse. In this video, you’ll learn how to import projects in Eclipse. Okay, let’s get started.

Time – 00:12
On my website luv2code.com, I would download some sample projects, so I’ll go to luv2code.com/sample-eclipse-project. On this page, there is a link to download the source code. It’s a zipped Eclipse project. I’ll select the link and I’ll download it to my computer.

Time – 00:30
Now on Eclipse, I’ll import the project. I’ll right click, I’ll select Import, and then I’ll choose General and then Existing Projects into Workspace. Select Next. I’ll select the archive file, then I’ll choose Browse, and I’ll browse over to that file that was just downloaded. I’ll hit Open. Then, I’ll select the project and then I’ll hit Finish. Now, we have the project imported.

Time – 01:14
During the import, Eclipse extracted the zip file to your workspace directory. On your file system in your project workspace, you’ll see a newly created project folder. In this example, it’s Eclipse tutorial.

Time – 01:29
We can move back to Eclipse to run our program. This will confirm that everything was imported successfully. Great job.

Time – 01:38
This wraps up our video on importing projects into Eclipse. Please subscribe through our channel to view more videos on Eclipse and Java. Click the thumbs up to like our video. Also, visit our website luv2code.com to download Java source code used in this video.

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